Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Congress ‘the obvious culprit’ in divisive confirmation process

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Congress ‘the obvious culprit’ in divisive confirmation process


Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Wednesday pointed the finger at Congress for the mounting polarization of the judicial confirmation process.Without naming the highly contentious confirmation this month of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh, Justice Ginsburg lamented the state of the confirmation process during a discussion Wednesday night at the federal courthouse in Washington.She said things are not as they were when the late justice Antonin M. Scalia was confirmed unanimously in 1986 or when she was confirmed 96-3 in 1993, The Washington Post reported.“What a difference in time that was from what we are witnessing today,” she said, according to The Post.“To me, the obvious culprit is Congress,” she said, accusing members of failing to “reach across the aisle.”Justice Ginsburg said she admired retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s willingness to put “country above party and self-interest” and work “collaboratively to solve problems.”Collegiality, Justice Ginsburg said, “means understanding the institution you work for is more important than the egos of the individuals.”Her remarks came one day after Justice O’Connor announced she suffers from dementia.This isn’t the first time Justice Ginsburg has criticized the confirmation process since Justice Kavanaugh’s hearings began. On Sept. 12, she said it had devolved into a “highly partisan show.”“The Republicans move in lockstep, and so do the Democrats,” she said at the time. “I wish I could wave a magic wand and have it go back to the way it was.”Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.The Washington Times Comment PolicyThe Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.
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